Dhammapada - Brahmanavagga

Back Home
# Verse
383 O Brahmana, cut off the stream of craving with diligence, and abandon sense desires. O Brahmana, perceiving the cessation of the conditioned, be an arahat who realizes Nibbana, the Unconditioned.
384 When the brahmana is well-established in the two dhammas (i.e., the practice of Tranquillity and Insight Meditation), then, in that knowing one, all fetters are destroyed.
385 Him I call a brahmana who has for him neither this shore (i.e., the sense-bases) nor the other shore (i.e., the sense objects), and who is undistressed and free from moral defilements.
386 Him I call a brahmana, who dwells in seclusion practising Tranquility and Insight Meditation and is free from taints (of moral defilements); who has performed his duties, and is free from moral intoxicants (asavas) and has reached the highest goal (arahatship).
387 By day shines the sun; by night shines the moon; in regalia shines the king; in meditation shines the arahat; but the Buddha in his glory shines at all times, by day and by night.
388 Because he has discarded evil he is called a 'brahmana'; because he lives calmly he is called a 'samana'; and because he gets rid of his impurities he is called a 'pabbajita'.
389 One should not strike a brahmana; a brahmana should not get angry with his assailant; it is shameful to strike a brahmana; it is more shameful to get angry with one's assailant.
390 For a brahmana there is no benefit at all if he does not restrain from anger to which his mind is prone. Inasmuch as one desists from the intention to harm, to that extent dukkha ceases.
391 Him I call a brahmana who does no evil in deed or word or thought, who is restrained in these three respects.
392 If from somebody one should learn the Teaching of the Buddha, he should respectfully pay homage to that teacher, as a brahmin worships the sacrificial fire.
393 Not by wearing matted hair, nor by lineage, nor by caste, does one become a brahmana; only he who realizes the Truth and the Dhamma is pure; he is a brahmana.
394 O foolish one! What is the use of wearing matted hair? What is the use of your wearing a garment made of antelope skin? In you, there is a forest (of moral defilements); you clean yourself only externally.
395 Him I call a brahmana who wears robes made from rags (picked up from a dust heap), who is lean with veins standing out, who meditates alone in the forest.
396 I do not call him a brahmana just because he is born from the womb of a brahmana mother. He is just a bhovadi brahmin if he is not free from moral defilements. Him I call a brahmana, who is free from moral defilements and from attachment.
397 Him I call a brahmana, who has cut off all fetters and is fearless, who is beyond attachment and is free from moral defilements.
398 Him I call a brahmana, who has cut the strap (of ill will), the thong (of craving) and the cord (of wrong views together with latent defilements), who has lifted the bar that fastens the door (of ignorance), and who knows the Truth.
399 Him I call a brahmana, who, without anger endures abuse, beating and being bound, and to whom the strength of patience is like the strength of an army.
400 Him I call a brahmana, who is free from anger, who practises austerity, who is virtuous and free from craving, who is controlled in his senses and for whom this body (i.e., existence) is the very last.
401 Him I call a brahmana, who does not cling to sensual pleasures, just as water does not cling to a lotus leaf, or the mustard seed to the tip of an awl.
402 Him I call a brahmana, who even in this existence realizes the end of dukkha (i.e., Nibbana), who has laid down the burden (of the khandhas) and who is free from moral defilements.
403 Him I call a brahmana, who is wise and is profound in his knowledge, who knows the right way from the wrong way, and who has attained the highest goal (i.e., arahatship).
404 Him I call a brahmana, who associates not with the householder or with the homeless one, or with both, who is free from sensual desire and has few wants.
405 Him I call a brahmana, who has laid aside the use of force towards all beings, the perturbed as well as the unperturbed (i.e., arahats), and who does not kill or cause others to kill.
406 Him I call a brahmana, who is not hostile to those who are hostile, who is peaceful (i.e., has laid aside the use of force) to those with weapons, and who is without attachment to objects of attachment.
407 Him I call a brahmana, from whom passion, ill will, pride and detraction have fallen off like a mustard seed from the tip of an awl.
408 Him I call a brahmana, who speaks gentle, instructive and true words, and who does not offend anyone by speech.
409 Him I call a Brahmana, who, in this world takes nothing that is not given him, be it long or short, big or small, good or bad.
410 Him I call a brahmana, who has no desire either for this world or for the next, who is free from craving and from moral defilements.
411 Him I called a brahmana, who has no craving, who through knowledge of the Four Noble Truths is free from doubt, and has realized Nibbana the Deathless.
412 Him I call a brahmana, who, in this world, has transcended both ties good and evil; who is sorrowless and, being free from the taints of moral defilements, is pure.
413 Him I call a brahmana, who, like the moon (in a cloudless sky), is pure, clear and serene, and in whom craving for existence is extinct.
414 Him I call a brahmana, who, having traversed this dangerous swamp (of passion), this difficult road (of moral defilements), the ocean of life (samsara) and the darkness of ignorance (moha), and having crossed the fourfold Flood, has reached the other shore (Nibbana); who practises Tranquility and Insight Meditation, who is free from craving and from doubt, who clings to nothing and remains in perfect peace.
415 Him I call a brahmana, who, in this world, has given up sensual pleasures, and leaving the home-life has become a bhikkhu; who has eradicated sensual desires and has come to the end of existence.
416 Him I call a brahmana, who, in this world, has given up craving, and leaving the home-life has become a bhikkhu; who has eradicated craving and has come to the end of existence.
417 Him I call a brahmana, who has given up attachment to (sensual pleasures of) human life, has transcended attachment to (sensual pleasures of) deva life and is completely free from all attachment.
418 Him I call a brahmana, who has given up taking delight (in sensual pleasures) and not taking delight (in solitude); who has attained perfect peace and is free from moral defilements; who has overcome all the five khandhas (lit., the world) and is diligent.
419 Him I call a brahmana, who knows the death and rebirth of beings in every detail, who is detached, who follows the good practice and knows the Four Noble Truths.
420 Him I call a brahmana, whose destination the devas or gandhabbas or men do not know who has eradicated moral intoxicants and is an arahat.
421 Him I call a brahmana, who does not cling to the past, future and present khandha aggregates and who is free from moral defilements and attachment.
422 Him I call a brahmana, who is fearless like a bull, who is noble and diligent, who is a seeker of high moral virtues and a conqueror (of three Maras), who is free from craving, who has been cleansed of moral defilements and knows the Four Noble Truths.
423 Him I call a brahmana, who knows past existences, who sees the celestial as well as the lower worlds, who has reached the end of rebirths, who, with Magga Insight, has become an arahat and has accomplished all that is to be accomplished for the eradication of moral defilements.

The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories
by Burma Tipitaka Association at http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/
Only for free distribution as a gift of Dhamma.