Dhammapada - Piyavagga

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# Verse
209 He who does what should not be done and fails to do what should be done, who forsakes the noble aim of life (i.e., Morality, Concentration and Insight) and grasps at sensual pleasure, covets the benefits gained by those who exert themselves (in meditation).
210 Do not associate with those who are dear, and never with those who are not dear to you; not seeing the dear ones is painful, and seeing those who are not dear to you is also painful.
211 Therefore, one should hold nothing dear; separation from the loved ones is painful; there are no fetters for those who do not love or hate.
212 Affection begets sorrow, affection begets fear. For him who is free from affection there is no sorrow; how can there be fear for him?
213 Endearment begets sorrow, endearment begets fear. For him who is free from endearment there is no sorrow; how can there be fear for him?
214 Attachment (to sensual pleasures) begets sorrow, attachment begets fear. For him who is free from attachment there is no sorrow; how can there be fear for him?
215 Lust begets sorrow, lust begets fear. For him who is free from lust there is no sorrow; how can there be fear for him?
216 Craving begets sorrow, craving begets fear. For him who is free from craving there is no sorrow; how can there be fear for him?
217 He who is endowed with Virtue and Insight, who is established in the Dhamma, who has realized the Truth and performs his own duties, is loved by all men.
218 He who has developed a desire for the Ineffable (i.e., Nibbana), whose mind reaches the same, and is no longer attached to the sensual world (kamaloka), is called one who is bound upstream (uddhamsoto).
219 A man who has long been absent and has returned home safely from a distance is welcomed with joy by relatives, friends and well-wishers on his return.
220 In the same way, his good deeds will receive him who has done good when he goes from this world to the other, as relatives receive a dear one on his return.

The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories
by Burma Tipitaka Association at http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/
Only for free distribution as a gift of Dhamma.