Dhammapada - Panditavagga

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# Verse
76 One should follow a man of wisdom who rebukes one for one's faults, as one would follow a guide to some buried treasure. To one who follows such a wise man, it will be an advantage and not a disadvantage.
77 The man of wisdom should admonish others; he should give advice and should prevent others from doing wrong; such a man is held dear by the good; he is disliked only by the bad.
78 One should not associate with bad friends, nor with the vile. One should associate with good friends, and with those who are noble.
79 He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas).
80 Farmers (lit., makers of irrigation canals) channel the water; fletchers straighten the arrow; carpenters work the timber; the Wise tame themselves.
81 As a mountain of rock is unshaken by wind, so also, the wise are unperturbed by blame or by praise.
82 Like a lake which is deep, clear and calm, the wise after listening to the Teaching (Dhamma) become serene.
83 Indeed, the virtuous give up all (i.e., attachment to the five khandhas, etc.); the virtuous (lit., the tranquil) do not talk with sensual desire; when faced with joy or sorrow, the wise do not show elation or depression.
84 For his own sake or for the sake of others, he does no evil; nor does he wish for sons and daughters or for wealth or for a kingdom by doing evil; nor does he wish for success by unfair means; such a one is indeed virtuous, wise and just.
85 Few among men reach the other shore (Nibbana); all the others only run up and down on this shore.
86 But those who practise according to the well-expounded Dhamma will reach the other shore (Nibbana), having passed the realm of Death (i.e., samsara), very difficult as it is to cross.
87 The man of wisdom, leaving the home of craving and having Nibbana as his goal, should give up dark, evil ways and cultivate pure, good ones. He should seek great delight in solitude, detachment and Nibbana, which an ordinary man finds so difficult to enjoy. He should also give up sensual pleasures, and clinging to nothing, should cleanse himself of all impurities of the mind.
89 Those, with mind well-developed in the seven Factors of Enlightenment (bojjhanga), having rid themselves of all craving, rejoice in their abandonment of attachment. Such men, with all moral intoxicants eradicated, and powerful (with the light of Arahatta Magganana), have realized Nibbana in this world (i.e., with Khandha aggregates remaining).

The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories
by Burma Tipitaka Association at http://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/
Only for free distribution as a gift of Dhamma.